From granulation to spectral processing, with Max and Jitter

From granulation to spectral processing, with Max & Jitter: this is the title of the class I’m giving this year at the Conservatoire de Montbéliard.
It’s 17 meetings (Friday morning, 9-10:30), and the schedule is looking like that:

  1. Free sampling (September 17th)
  2. Granular “synthesis” (October 8th)
  3. Get ready for Halloween: Spectrum study! (October 22nd)
  4. Sonograms, back to Max (November 5th)
  5. The famous “Forbidden Planet” (November 26th)
  6. Christmas market in Montbéliard: Freeze your sounds! (December 3rd)
  7. Phase vocoder (December 17th)
  8. Old-fashioned vocoder (January 7th)
  9. Phase vocoder encore! (January 21st)
  10. Software design 101 (February 18th)
  11. [poly~]phony (March 11th)
  12. Hibernatus: frozen life (March 25th)
  13. Phase vocoder: still blurry! (April 8th)
  14. From melody to harmony (April 25th)
  15. Interactive speed (May 6th)
  16. Spectral sound slicing (May 20th)
  17. The best of both world (June 10th)

It will be my modest contribution to a great composition curriculum. Whether you are looking for a composition teacher, courses in electronic music, a community of composer students, or the secrets of hyper-systemic music, if you live in France (or Belgium, Switzerland, Luxembourg...), you should definitely check this out.

The curriculum is conveniently organized so that students from Paris, Strasbourg, or Lyon can attend: seventeen 2-day sessions meet about each other week, and there are a couple of intensive week-ends as well. Vital are two concert weeks during which student works are performed.

The teaching staff is made of the following composers:

  • Jacopo Baboni Schilingi (hyper-systemic music, composition for traditional instruments, interactive music...)
  • Frédéric Voisin (computer music...)
  • Lorenzo Bianchi (electronic music, sound design, studio techniques...)
  • Giacomo Platini (music analysis...)

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